Archive for Newsletter – Page 2

Book Talk

The Night Tiger

By: Yangsze Choo

Goodreads rating: 4.08/5

Captivating and lushly written, The Night Tiger explores the rich world of servants and masters, ancient superstition and modern ambition, sibling rivalry and unexpected love.  Woven through with Chinese folklore and a tantalizing mystery, this novel is a page-turner of the highest order.

Depth Perception

By: Linda Castillo

Narrator: Ann Marie Lee

Goodreads rating: 3.94/5

A killer is watching……Nat Jennings nearly died the night her family was murdered and spent the next three years wishing she had.  Now, she is returning to the sleepy bayou town of Bellerose, Louisiana, driven by cryptic messages only she can hear – messages pleading for her help.

After serving six years for a crime he didn’t commit, Nick Bastille is back in Bellerose, mourning his precious son, who drowned while Nick was away at prison, unable to protect him.  But when Nat approaches him with a shocking revelation, his denial slowly turns to a desire for revenge…..Together, they will hunt for a merciless killer who nearly destroyed them both once – and is now preparing to finish them off once and for all……

Food Safari: Earth, Fire & Water

Maeve O’Meara invites you on a journey around the world of cuisines, meeting home cooks and chefs from Asia, Europe, the Americas and the Middle East who are all passionate advocates of cooking with the best and most natural produce they can get.

Discover the pleasures of baking, roasting, one-pot cooking, or cooking Asian-style in a wok, with the people across the globe that know how to do it best.  Maeve guides the reader through the regions she visits throughout the book – their ingredients and influences – while explaining local techniques in the practical and accessible style that has already won her so many followers.  Food Safari: Earth, Fire, Water are packed with more than 170 recipes, full of crunch, bite and flavour, which explore age-old techniques and cutting-edge cookery.

Murders and Metaphors

By: Amanda Flower

Goodreads rating:  4.43/5

Best selling author Amanda Flower,  is back with the third in her more-charming-than-ever Magical Bookshop mystery.  Fans of Sofie Kelly and Heather Blake, prepare your bookshelves!

Stalker

By:  Lars Kepler

Goodreads rating: 4.09/5

A terrifying new thriller.  Detective Joona Linna – recently returned from compassionate leave, reunites with hypnotist Erik Maria Bark in a search for a seemingly unassailable sadistic killer.

The Stupendously Spectacular Spelling Bee

By: Deborah Abela

Goodreads rating; 4.2/5

A heartwarming story about a girl who’s afraid to follow her dreams, and the family who help make them happen.

At the Library

By: Heather Alexander and Ipek Konak

This beautifully illustrated book introduces children to libraries, big and small, and all of the amazing things these institutions have to offer.  From books to computers, from story time to special guests and from unique collections to very important rules.  This is a wonderful way for children to learn about libraries and the value of reading, sharing and community.

In addition, the unique design of the book allows children to discover a ‘hidden’ image by holding the page up to a bright light, much like a lift-the-flap mechanism.   For children aged 3 and up, this is an excellent and inclusive introduction to libraries.

Australian Backyard Earth Scientist

By: Peter Macinnis

Every activity in the book has been done from scratch and photographed, so readers can see the steps and read a logical account that leaves nothing out.  Author, Peter Macinnis hopes to give adults tools with which to infect another generation.

The Good Gut Diet

By: Women’s Weekly

The best way to look after your health is to eat a wide variety of wholesome gut-loving foods.  Follow the good gut diet to support your immune system, manage your weight, improve your moods, and keep stress and anxiety at bay.  If you’re good to your gut, your gut will be good to you!

 

Did you know?

It was a WA Dentist who captured the centre of the Ottoman Empire

Popular history tells us that Sir T.E. Lawrence of Arabia drove into Damascus on 1 October 1918. However, it was actually a dentist from Western Australia who outstripped the revered commander by a matter of hours.

Lieutenant-Colonel Arthur Olden, commander of the 10th Australian Lighthorse Regiment, had already arrived at the capital of the Ottoman Empire and encircled the town hall. Drawing his revolver, Olden entered and formally received the surrender of Governor Emir Said before Lawrence was even in sight of the city. The document of surrender handed to the Lieutenant-Colonel hails him as the first “to enter Damascus, in the bravest manner known of the Saxon race”.

Despite Sir Lawrence’s memoirs and Hollywood blockbusters, Australian Lieutenant-General Sir Harry Chauvel notes that English forces were far from the first to enter Damascus:

“The first of the Arab forces to enter Damascus were those who followed Lawrence in and, by that time, an Australian Brigade and at least one regiment of Indian Cavalry had passed right through.”

Caretakers to our local history.

Image courtesy SLWA

Recently, the conservation team at the State Library of Western Australia authenticated a number of maps belonging to Lieutenant Olden. These documents outline much of the campaign to drive the Ottoman Empire back into Damascus and are important relics of international and local history. Thankfully, collections such as these exist to preserve this information within libraries, tasked with the noble duty of caretakers to our history.

At Eaton Community Library we are always collecting for our local history. We have such a rich and varied past in the Shire of Dardanup and it is important to ensure our story is documented and accessible to everyone. Everything from Fee’s Diaries and oral histories of Dardanup, to memoirs of the greater Bunbury area is included in our growing collection. A fantastic recent inclusion has been the The Gravel Pit which tells the story of Charles and Rachel Hill. Their family would go on to comprise much of our Aboriginal population of the local area, including Eaton, Burekup, and Dardanup.

If you would like to do some family history research, we have access to the Ancestry.com database for free (can only be accessed within the library). We also have books on how to do genealogy research. It’s a fascinating subject and something that is easier now than ever before with the online resources available.

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Summer Reading Club a success!

A great summer of reading!

Shire of Dardanup Library Services would like to thank everyone who participated in our Curious Creatures Summer Reading Club.

With almost 8o kids registering, it was fantastic to see so many excited readers coming in to tell us how much they had read.

Summer Reading Club is an initiative that is held by the State Library of Queensland to encourage kids to continue reading over the school holidays to keep their literacy levels up. This was our first year of full participation in the national program. All our readers received a bag full of Curious Creatures goodies and activities to help them stay with the program over the holidays and give them a chance to win some great prizes.

Prize Winners

Congratulations to our lucky Grand Prize winner, Dawid Opperman who won the David Walliams Biggest Boxset Collection and a $50 iTunes voucher and also to runners up Emily and Miranda Hickling, and Denika and Kaden Hay. On your next visit we encourage all our Summer Readers to ask for their participation certificates.

  

Well done again to everyone who took part and we look forward to doing it all again next summer!

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Did you know?

Words We Owe To Shakespeare

It has been more than 400 years since Shakespeare’s death and we still use his language. The Bard has been credited with introducing around 1,700 words to the English language.

Shakespearewords

Are you generous or frugal? A champion or lacklustre? You would be surprised at how many words we use today that were first written by Shakespeare.

Some words he invented and some were in common use but hadn’t been written down anywhere yet. Shakespeare used the language of kings and queens as well as the common people.

He coined the use of many common phrases we still use such as:

  • Break the ice
  • Refuse to budge an inch
  • Eaten me out of house and home
  • For goodness’ sake
  • Good riddance
  • Heart of gold
  • Laughing stock
  • Wild-goose chase

The Many Faces Of Shakespeare

There are many different portraits of Shakespeare in the world. With three quite different portraits as most likely to resemble Shakespeare himself.

Shakespearemanyfaces

The Droeshout portrait was done around 1622, six years after Shakespeare’s death. However it was done within living memory of people who knew him well and his contemporary, Ben Jonson implied it was a good likeness.

The Chandos portrait was painted in Shakespeare’s lifetime around 1610. Many believe it is a true portrait of Shakespeare painted from life, but it is not able to be definitively substantiated.

The Cobbe portrait is another portrait allegedly drawn from life, but is also unsubstantiated.

So that’s the short and the long of it and all’s well that ends well.

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Did you know?

Happy (un-un)Birthday Lewis Carroll

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