Author Archive for Eaton Library

Watch your Waste with the Library

Want to do more recycling, reduce contamination, and save $$$?

Over the past few years waste management has become a massive issue in our communities.

Through our heightened environmental awareness, community programs, garbage disposal costs and popular media there is a growing sense of urgency in our communities that something must be done about the war on waste.

Wouldn’t it be wonderful to reduce your waste by half?  Or recycle items you would normally throw out?  For example, instead of binning all of your food scraps, it could feed a worm farm in your garden. Or take your clean egg cartons to a kindy or pre-school for craft activities. In fact there are so many ways we can recycle our rubbish that sometimes it is difficult to know exactly where to start.

Shire of Dardanup Library Services can help there.

We have a range of books, documentaries, and online media that will help you get immersed in the recycling way:

Books: 

Reducing waste/Flounders, Anne.

Recycled crafts box : sock puppets, cardboard castles, bottle bugs & 37 more earth-friendly projects & activities you can create/Martin, Laura C.

Recycling and managing waste/Healey, Justin.

Recycle your garden/Marshall, Tim.

Go green!/Gogerly, Liz,

Reduce, reuse, recycle/Rissman, Rebecca,

Online eBooks: 

The zero waste lifestyle/Korst, Amy

My zero waste kitchen easy ways to eat waste free/Turner, Kate

Recycled chic/McKittrick, Amanda

Less Stuff/Miles, Lindsay

Online eFilm:

Car recycling

Solid waste disposal and recycling

Glass recycling

Paper recycling

Aluminum can recycling

Recycle this : A Joe and Jack episode

Online Series:

Curiosity Quest Goes Green

ABC’s War on Waste

If you’d like to know more about any of these items or our collection, please contact or visit us at Eaton Community Library or Dardanup Library.

Our friendly team are always keen to help you find just what you’re looking for.

Insightful evening with Tony Buti

On Thursday evening, 11 July, Eaton Community Library hosted sitting MP, lawyer, and author, Antonio Buti, who was here to discuss his latest book, A Stolen Life.

The discussion centred very much around Bruce Trevorrow, whose life and legal pursuit of the South Australian Government was at the heart of A Stolen Life. Tony shared a portrait of a man whose life had been turned upside down and the legal ramifications it had on the nation.

Following the discussion, the audience engaged with Tony in a Q&A where he shared his experiences growing up in Collie and his work on the Stolen Generations submission. Attendees then stayed on for refreshments as they met with Tony for further conversation and a book signing.

We are incredibly grateful to all who attended and helping to make it such a wonderful evening and would like to thank Tony for his generosity and making himself available.

If you would like to know more about our Author Conversation series please contact us, and please remember to book for our August event with Steve Hawke.

Novel Conversations

What do you know about Gnomes?

Read More →

Novel Conversations

Celebrate Christmas in Australia!

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Did you know?

To Kill a Mockingbird was the result of a generous Christmas gift.

We all look for that perfect present for those we care about. Something both meaningful and inspiring. In the late 1950s, a Broadway composer and his wife gave just such a gift to a struggling young writer named Nelle Harper Lee.

Lee wanted to write after developing an interest in English literature in high school. After graduation, she attended Huntingdon College in Alabama for one year, and focused on writing. She then transferred to the University of Alabama to study law before turning her sights back to writing. She wrote for the university newspaper before dropping out of college without achieving a degree, opting to move to New York to pursue a writing career.

To support herself in New York, Lee worked for several years as an airline ticket agent.  She struggled with working to support herself and having the time and energy to write. Luckily for Lee, she befriended Michael and Joy Brown. Michael was a popular composer and lyricist who worked on Broadway, and was financially well off.

For Christmas 1956, the Browns gave Lee a generous gift: one year’s wages. With the gift came a note saying, ‘You have one year off from your job to write whatever you please. Merry Christmas.’ Who could say no to that? Lee quit her airline job, and once free to write what she wanted, produced the story that would become To Kill a Mockingbird.

Reportedly, the first draft read like several short stories stitched together, rather than a seamlessly written novel. But the Browns had also put Lee in touch with a literary agent, Maurice Crain.  With Crain and editor Tay Hohoff, Lee reworked the initial manuscript, and two and a half years of rewrites followed. Even after those rewrites, Lee was warned that the book probably wouldn’t sell more than few thousand copies.

However, Lee’s hard work paid off beyond her wildest expectation. Perhaps it was published at just the right time, as the civil rights movement was kicking off in earnest. Whatever the reason, the book’s popularity skyrocketed shortly after its publication in 1960. It was picked up by the Book-of-the-Month Club and the Literary Guild, featured in Reader’s Digest, and won a variety of literary awards, including the prestigious Pulitzer Prize. By 1962, it had been made into an award-winning movie.

To Kill a Mockingbird has now sold over 30 million copies, and has been translated into 40 languages and remains hugely relevant even today. In 2009, it was reported that Lee was still earning $9,249 in royalties every day. At the time of her death in early 2016, Lee’s estate was valued at over $45 million. The Brown’s original Christmas gift to Harper Lee had multiplied many times over.

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