Author Archive for Eaton Library

Book Talk

The Night Tiger

By: Yangsze Choo

Goodreads rating: 4.08/5

Captivating and lushly written, The Night Tiger explores the rich world of servants and masters, ancient superstition and modern ambition, sibling rivalry and unexpected love.  Woven through with Chinese folklore and a tantalizing mystery, this novel is a page-turner of the highest order.

Depth Perception

By: Linda Castillo

Narrator: Ann Marie Lee

Goodreads rating: 3.94/5

A killer is watching……Nat Jennings nearly died the night her family was murdered and spent the next three years wishing she had.  Now, she is returning to the sleepy bayou town of Bellerose, Louisiana, driven by cryptic messages only she can hear – messages pleading for her help.

After serving six years for a crime he didn’t commit, Nick Bastille is back in Bellerose, mourning his precious son, who drowned while Nick was away at prison, unable to protect him.  But when Nat approaches him with a shocking revelation, his denial slowly turns to a desire for revenge…..Together, they will hunt for a merciless killer who nearly destroyed them both once – and is now preparing to finish them off once and for all……

Food Safari: Earth, Fire & Water

Maeve O’Meara invites you on a journey around the world of cuisines, meeting home cooks and chefs from Asia, Europe, the Americas and the Middle East who are all passionate advocates of cooking with the best and most natural produce they can get.

Discover the pleasures of baking, roasting, one-pot cooking, or cooking Asian-style in a wok, with the people across the globe that know how to do it best.  Maeve guides the reader through the regions she visits throughout the book – their ingredients and influences – while explaining local techniques in the practical and accessible style that has already won her so many followers.  Food Safari: Earth, Fire, Water are packed with more than 170 recipes, full of crunch, bite and flavour, which explore age-old techniques and cutting-edge cookery.

Murders and Metaphors

By: Amanda Flower

Goodreads rating:  4.43/5

Best selling author Amanda Flower,  is back with the third in her more-charming-than-ever Magical Bookshop mystery.  Fans of Sofie Kelly and Heather Blake, prepare your bookshelves!

Stalker

By:  Lars Kepler

Goodreads rating: 4.09/5

A terrifying new thriller.  Detective Joona Linna – recently returned from compassionate leave, reunites with hypnotist Erik Maria Bark in a search for a seemingly unassailable sadistic killer.

The Stupendously Spectacular Spelling Bee

By: Deborah Abela

Goodreads rating; 4.2/5

A heartwarming story about a girl who’s afraid to follow her dreams, and the family who help make them happen.

At the Library

By: Heather Alexander and Ipek Konak

This beautifully illustrated book introduces children to libraries, big and small, and all of the amazing things these institutions have to offer.  From books to computers, from story time to special guests and from unique collections to very important rules.  This is a wonderful way for children to learn about libraries and the value of reading, sharing and community.

In addition, the unique design of the book allows children to discover a ‘hidden’ image by holding the page up to a bright light, much like a lift-the-flap mechanism.   For children aged 3 and up, this is an excellent and inclusive introduction to libraries.

Australian Backyard Earth Scientist

By: Peter Macinnis

Every activity in the book has been done from scratch and photographed, so readers can see the steps and read a logical account that leaves nothing out.  Author, Peter Macinnis hopes to give adults tools with which to infect another generation.

The Good Gut Diet

By: Women’s Weekly

The best way to look after your health is to eat a wide variety of wholesome gut-loving foods.  Follow the good gut diet to support your immune system, manage your weight, improve your moods, and keep stress and anxiety at bay.  If you’re good to your gut, your gut will be good to you!

 

New Books to the Library

 

 

 

Novel Conversations

What do you know about Gnomes?

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Novel Conversations

Celebrate Christmas in Australia!

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Did you know?

To Kill a Mockingbird was the result of a generous Christmas gift.

We all look for that perfect present for those we care about. Something both meaningful and inspiring. In the late 1950s, a Broadway composer and his wife gave just such a gift to a struggling young writer named Nelle Harper Lee.

Lee wanted to write after developing an interest in English literature in high school. After graduation, she attended Huntingdon College in Alabama for one year, and focused on writing. She then transferred to the University of Alabama to study law before turning her sights back to writing. She wrote for the university newspaper before dropping out of college without achieving a degree, opting to move to New York to pursue a writing career.

To support herself in New York, Lee worked for several years as an airline ticket agent.  She struggled with working to support herself and having the time and energy to write. Luckily for Lee, she befriended Michael and Joy Brown. Michael was a popular composer and lyricist who worked on Broadway, and was financially well off.

For Christmas 1956, the Browns gave Lee a generous gift: one year’s wages. With the gift came a note saying, ‘You have one year off from your job to write whatever you please. Merry Christmas.’ Who could say no to that? Lee quit her airline job, and once free to write what she wanted, produced the story that would become To Kill a Mockingbird.

Reportedly, the first draft read like several short stories stitched together, rather than a seamlessly written novel. But the Browns had also put Lee in touch with a literary agent, Maurice Crain.  With Crain and editor Tay Hohoff, Lee reworked the initial manuscript, and two and a half years of rewrites followed. Even after those rewrites, Lee was warned that the book probably wouldn’t sell more than few thousand copies.

However, Lee’s hard work paid off beyond her wildest expectation. Perhaps it was published at just the right time, as the civil rights movement was kicking off in earnest. Whatever the reason, the book’s popularity skyrocketed shortly after its publication in 1960. It was picked up by the Book-of-the-Month Club and the Literary Guild, featured in Reader’s Digest, and won a variety of literary awards, including the prestigious Pulitzer Prize. By 1962, it had been made into an award-winning movie.

To Kill a Mockingbird has now sold over 30 million copies, and has been translated into 40 languages and remains hugely relevant even today. In 2009, it was reported that Lee was still earning $9,249 in royalties every day. At the time of her death in early 2016, Lee’s estate was valued at over $45 million. The Brown’s original Christmas gift to Harper Lee had multiplied many times over.

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